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The Long-Range Handgun Load

The Long-Range Handgun Load/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d75e1cd7_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d75e1cd7_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Shooting traditional handgun cartridges at long range takes practice and careful loading. You have to do a lot of things right to make it work, starting with the handgun load. This week’s column deals with long-range handgun loads for revolvers and semi-auto pistols in 9mm, .357, .41, .44 and .45 calibers (not for “hand rifles” and their associated rifle calibers; I have nothing against the hand-held long shooter, such as the Remington XP and its clones, but loading for them and their longer barrels is a science unto itself). I have been an avid handgunner since my teenage years but didn’t really get hooked until I bought my first revolver, a Smith & Wesson Model 28, in 1973. This is the Highway Patrolman model, same exactly as the N-frame Model 27 except for finish. With its 6-inch barrel and my near-maximum handloads, that first 28 took several deer and various varmints to over 200 yards. This was made possible due largely to the fact that I was shooting it every day. My brother-in-law owned the exact same model and, for a period of several years, neither of us was ever without a Smith. Anyone interested in long-range handgunning should secure a copy of Sixguns by Keith, the standard reference work by Elmer Keith. Through descriptions of his various experiences written in that wonderful bygone “Keith” style, he draws a good picture of just what can be accomplished with a good handgun and a healthy dose of practice. This book was largely responsible for my entry into the world of handgun hunting; I still enjoy re-reading it today. Truly, the man that is well-practiced with a good handgun has no trouble bringing home the game. Related GunDigest Articles Shooting Circles Long-Range Shooting Ethics: How Far is Too Far? Photos: 5 Best Survival Handguns Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! The revolver is usually the subject when long-range handgunning is discussed. Ed McGivern, that wizard of fast and fancy revolver shooting, once said that armed with a good 6-inch .357 magnum revolver he felt he was the match of any man with a 94 Winchester to 600 yards. While I might not entirely agree with that statement, I feel completely comfortable carrying the 6-inch Smith during deer season as my only gun. In my Model 28 Smith and my two Ruger single action guns — one a Bisley with 7 ½-inch barrel and the other a Blackhawk with 4 5/8-inch barrel — I use 14.5 grains of #2400 with the 158-grain Hornady or Nosler jacketed hollowpoint. This one load has proven very accurate and stiff enough to kill our large-bodied mountain whitetails to 200 yards, usually completely penetrating them. While I have owned and shot just about all the “normal” handgun calibers I still like the .357 best of all, for killing power, trajectory and “shootability”, the ability to keep all of the shots in the X ring. By the way, since these loads are for a revolver, a good strong crimp is necessary to keep the bullets from backing out in the cylinders when you let one go! The .41 magnum is a wonderful cartridge for long-range shooting and in a fairly heavy revolver with a 6” barrel it can be mastered by most shooters. My favorite load in the Model 57 Smith & Wesson is 21.8 grains of H110 with the 210-grain Hornady flat point. This load will flatten the biggest whitetail with a solid shoulder hit — at least that’s what it’s done for the 10 years I have shot with it. There may be a difference in performance between the 240-grain, .44 Magnum load and this .41 load, but I can’t see it in live, deer-sized game. It’s very flat shooting for ranges between 100 and 200 yards.

It Should Concern Us All. NFA violation in Arkansas:

It Should Concern Us All. NFA violation in Arkansas:

(Update: see the comments for an update on this case. Thank you Jbob for keeping us informed as to the ongoing legal situation) What would happen if you were falsely accused of road rage? What if the accuser said you brandished a weapon? What if you had a AR15 pistol in your possession and that item played a role in a 30 month sentence? It happened in Arkansas. There was a comedy of errors involved in the following case. Let me preface this in saying in no way, had I sat on the jury, would I have allowed him to be convicted on this charge. Here is a link to the charge. In quick summary: After a call to the local police by the “victim” accusing Justin, the now convicted, of brandishing a Glock, the police located Justin’s vehicle at a nearby eatery where they conducted a warrant-less search of his vehicle. In the vehicle they found a AR15 pistol with a carbine buffer tube, a supposedly attached butt-stock, and a M16 fire control group installed on the pistol (but no auto sear) in a bag. Seems pretty clear cut doesn’t it? Justin had a M16 / Unregistered SBR in the bag, but there is more to the story… According to friends telling us this sad tale over on AR15.com , the convicted is a straight laced guy who was a bit too lackadaisical about his firearm and the potential for trouble that existed with his gear. According to the sources from ARFCOM, the convicted brought two lowers to the range for troubleshooting a finicky upper receiver. It’s unclear the exact configurations, but from what can be surmised is he had at least one carbine upper and one pistol length upper. He had two lower receivers in the car, from what I can tell, one was a pistol configuration, the other a rifle. The convicted had attempted to troubleshoot his gear at the range, but was not sufficiently prepared for the problems he encountered with law enforcement and the various parts / configurations present in his vehicle. Local law enforcement received a call whereby the convicted was accused of brandishing a Glock during a road rage incident. He was later located at a eatery and his vehicle was “inventoried” without his consent. A LEO produced a unregistered SBR which the convicted stateed that it was not in a SBR configuration when he put it away in the range bag (as in the pistol and carbine buffer tube equiped lower receiver DID NOT have a stock attached). The police also noted that the safety flipped 180 degrees… and here is where more trouble starts; it was a M16 fire control group. Without a third hole, the gun would not fire automatically, you and I know that… it can potentially slam fire a few rounds, but this is unsafe and unsustainable as it could cause a kaboom. We know this, but does a jury? Luckily the machine gun charges were tossed out. Let’s assume Justin was innocent of any attempted wrongdoing. Let’s assume that he had everything disassembled properly and the cops are the persons who actually created the short barreled rifle. That he didn’t order a M16 FCG to try and play with full auto. There was actually no GLOCK produced from his vehicle so the accusation of pointing a gun was never proven. What can we learn? The cops can create a SBR out of parts in your car despite your best efforts to follow the law. If they did so and it proceeded to court, would a police officer admit to creating a SBR illegally? Hell no they wouldn’t own up to it. Sometimes the cops will search a vehicle without a warrant, and the courts may accept the evidence produced regardless of legality of the search. Swapping pistol configurations to and from carbine lowers, stocks, and rifle uppers with pistol components in the bag can be mishandled / misunderstood by law enforcement and later, the jury. Having a M16 FCG in a non registered lower, despite it being unable to fire automatically, does not help you make your case to the jury that your an innocent gun owner falsely accused. There is lots of grey area here. I am sure we cannot assume the convicted is simply not guilty of anything. The police claim they found the pistol assembled with a rifle buttstock in the vehicle, where as the convicted claims it was separated in a bag from the stock. The problem is that law enforcement could easily mishandle your gear and create illegal configurations. Your word against theirs. If his pistol was brought to the range with permanently attached sig brace, or another such product which couldn’t be easily dissembled on the scene, he would have been free and clear after producing the ATF’s compliance letter regarding such braces. Or he could have gone full monty and had it registered as a SBR. Having a carbine buffer tube on a pistol lower permits anyone to easily install a butt-stock which is just sitting around and thus they create a SBR. It may or may not have been the convicted’s fault. Cops said it was this way, convicted said it was that way. Wronged or not, it cost him a 30 month sentence. Don’t play fast and loose with AR15 components. Don’t give any credence or instill any doubt to the prosecuting attorneys arguments.  Get it registered, and keep things apart. What if you had a pistol upper and lower, and a rifle upper and lower, disassembled in your range bag? If law enforcement put each back together the wrong way, how will you defend yourself? I don’t own any AR15 pistols. Legal as they are, they look like they can add a bit of trouble to your life pretty easily. I did have a SBR, but that was sold last year. I own pistols that are pistols, and AR15’s that are rifles. I have nothing in my possession that would permit illegal configurations. Best of luck to the convicted. He is attempting legal means to get the charges dropped. If I ever sit on jury duty for such a case where a “victimless crime” NFA violation occurred, I would let him / her walk, because I am a believer in the Second Amendment and “shall not be infringed”. We all can’t count on a gun knowledgable or friendly jury though. Be careful out there team. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Shemaghs, A Survival Must Have in 2020

Shemaghs, A Survival Must Have in 2020

From time to time we get an update to an original article here at SurvivalCache that we want to share with our readers.  “ 30 Uses for a Bandanna ” has been a very popular post and one of our readers has written a great update. #1 Pick #1 Pick The Big Ass Bandana 100% Cotton, 42X42 inches, Multiple Colors 1000 times more useful then a normal bandana Indispensable for Every Day Carry View Latest Price Quick Navigation The Shemagh Review What is a Shemagh? Everyday Shemagh Uses Recommend: Tactical Face Shield (Shemagh) Other Recommended Shemaghs "The Shemagh Review" What is a Shemagh? When I deployed to the Middle East, I found that all the locals in-country would wrap their in cloth, to cover their faces and/or heads.  Even on relatively nice days, these people would cover their faces while the rest of the American soldiers would not.  I thought to myself “Well, they must be onto something here.”  It was only during a power outage in our living area that I discovered why.  When the lights were out, I turned on my flashlight and discovered that there was a pretty significant amount of dust illuminated by the beam of light, and it didn’t strike me as a particularly windy or dusty evening. CLICK HERE TO SEE OUR RECOMMENDED SHEMAGH PRODUCTS This prompted me to order a shemagh which, as many of you may know, is a traditional Middle Eastern headdress used for ages to protect the wearer from blowing dust, keep the sun off the neck, head and face, and as a wrap for warmth on cold desert nights.  Once I learned how to tie it around my head properly, which is not a difficult task with a little research on the Internet, this became one of my regular pieces of equipment.  If the dust kicks up suddenly, I would put it on. This prevented the sand from finding its way into my nose, mouth, and ears.  While it will not eliminate it all, it certainly helps significantly.  In this type of environment, use should obviously be accompanied with goggles. In browsing SurvivalCache.com , I came across the article “ 30 Uses for a Bandana ” and upon reading it, I immediately concluded that a shemagh would be better suited for all of these tasks. There is a lot of material to play with, but the shemagh does not take up a lot of room and is relatively cheap.  It is also 100% cotton.  I have used it as a makeshift air conditioner dust filter, a sweat rag, a sand/wind/dust wrap, a gear cover during sand storms, a cooling rag (when wet), and a number of other things.  I highly encourage anyone reading this to purchase one and give it a shot. CLICK HERE TO SEE OUR RECOMMENDED SHEMAGH PRODUCTS "Everyday Shemagh Uses" The every day uses, and uses during a survival situation, such as a natural disaster, would be endless. If any particulates remain in the air following an earthquake, building collapse, fire, etc. and you do not have a mask (I’d bet you won’t) you will have face and head protection.  If you find yourself without adequate shelter in the cold, one of these shemaghs could provide additional insulation. I would encourage you to read  “ 30 Uses for a Bandana ” as this is a very informative article and is completely relevant to this piece of equipment. Shemaghs come in a number of colors too, so I have added an olive drab/black one for concealment, and a red/white one for visibility in my Bug Out Bag .  A word of caution: I would avoid traditional colors (black/white, red/white) when traveling to the Middle East for they have certain cultural connotations.  You can find them in non-traditional colors easily, such as tan/black, red/black, blue/black, etc to suit your taste and your environment. They can be found on Amazon for a reasonable price, or we highly recommend this multi-use tactical shemagh .  Purchase one or two and you will be amazed how many uses it has, and you will add a few others to your survival kit , guaranteed. Now let’s look at some of our most recommended products you can get today. Recommend: "Tactical Face Shield" (Shemagh) We partnered with a manufacturer to bring you a very versatile and tactical face shield , that works perfectly like a shemagh but has more use-cases. This shemagh has UV protection, dust protection, and is moisture-wicking. It’s U.S. made and one size fits all. The design of this face shield protects against dust, insects, bugs, cold breezes, and more. We have a very limited supply of these products that we are giving away for FREE . You just have to pay shipping costs. Check out the details of these shemaghs by going here! "Other Recommended Shemaghs" Here are our other top picks: Proforce Equipment Shemagh, One Size Fits Most,... See Price on Amazon Maddog Shemagh Tactical Desert Scarf Paintball... See Price on Amazon Sale 100 percent Cotton Military Shemagh Arab Tactical... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 04:58 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Photos By: SKB Photography , Daijo , ThomasWoodson Other interesting articles: Crovel Elite Survival Shovel Review for 2020 Bivvy Sack Review in 2020: Much Better Than an Emergency Blanket! Spyderco Bushcraft Knife Review for 2020: Survival Knife Urban Survival Guide for 2020: All You Need To Know!

Best Affordable Optics that Wont Break on You

Best Affordable Optics that Wont Break on You

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Attaching an Aimpoint, a Trijicon, or a EOTech to sight even half a dozen guns in going to be insanely expensive. So you think…I’ll go cheaper . But then you hit the internets and start hearing that cheap optics are all garbage . Trijicons are not cheap… So you get the optics blues.  You can’t sell any of your guns, that would be a travesty.  You find out selling a kidney isn’t exactly legal, and you just don’t know what to do. Well you’re in luck.  I’m going to tell what you can do, and how to outfit your rifles, shotguns, and pistols without breaking the bank.  We are going to separate fact from fiction in terms of internet forums, and list a few affordable, but high quality optics. Cheap vs Affordable The internet wisdom of cheap optics are crap is somewhat true, cheap optics typically are crap. The problem is these intent commandos lump anything that isn’t Aimpoint, Trijicon, Steiner, Zeiss, or Leupold in the crap realm. That is where they are wrong.  There is a big difference between cheap and affordable.   Affordable doesn’t mean crap.  Affordable is often a compromise that delivers an optic that works, and will last, without some of the features higher end optics may have. Our Picks for Best Affordable Optics We picked out and tested some of the most popular affordable optics around.  Here are the best of the best. Burris Fastfire III ($205.00) Burris Fastfire III 249 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 249 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing I really like miniature red dots and I’m pretty pumped to see them become more popular in the last few years.  They are perfect for almost any gun, be it a handgun, rifle, or shotgun.  If you want small, and lightweight optic this is about as small as you are going to get. The Burris Fastfire series is awesome for a variety of reasons, one of them being its price.  It’s an actual, hand-to-God quality red dot optic that’s priced a bit under 200 dollars.  The Fastfire III is one of the originals in the miniature red dot optics, maybe not the first, but one of the pioneers. The Fastfire is perfect if you are interested in tossing a miniature red dot onto your handgun, but also not interested in spending North of 400 bucks.  The Fastfire is well known, and quite common, enough so that its standard for pistol optics mounts. Burris Fast Fire III It’s popular enough that Glock’s no 1 mount works with the Fastfire red dots.  The Fastfire features a 4 MOA reticle.  Typically with these red dots you want something that rides between too small and too big. A small dot is excellent for making precision shots, but miniature red dots aren’t really made for precision.  A big dot is better suited for close quarters shooting, and with a handgun this can be desirable. However, one of the big advantages to a red dot mounted handgun is your ability to shoot at longer ranges a bit easier. 4 MOA is a good little compromise.  The Fastfire is also made entirely of metal, with minimal plastic components.  It’s designed for heavy use to withstand thousands of rounds, and can be used to rack the slide one handed against a gun belt or table. Even if it fails it has a lifetime warranty. Personally when purchasing affordable optics I always look at the warranty.  This way if turns out to be not so great, I’ve still got a warranty to make sure my investment is protected. Holosun HS403A ($125.00) I’m typically a skeptical person when it comes to optics, and I tend to be shy of overseas brands.  Lately I have been coming around, especially if I’m looking for an optic for a fun gun, or a competition gun. You dont need an Eotech on something that’s just for fun. I’ve got different standards for my home defense or go to war guns than I do for my fun and competition guns, but that’s a story for another article. Best Red Dot Under $200 Holosun HS403A 170 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 170 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing If my life isn’t on the line I tend to be a bit more trusting.  That’s what lead me to the Holosun HS403A ($125).  Yes it is a made in China optic, but it’s certainly one the higher tiered made in China optics. And it was the winner of our Best Red Dots Under $200 .  It survived drops, heat, cold, and even rust issues. Budget Red Dots All On The optic is AR height and pretty lightweight and compact.  It’s not a miniature optic, but it’s a step below full size.  If minature red dots are Glock 26s this is a Glock 19. It’s a very simple, and robust red dot. Holosun also offers a lifetime warranty, which again is something I really want to see with optics on the affordable scale.  It’s me feel a little more confident to hit that Buy Now button. Bushnell AR ($145.00) and AK optics ($197.54) It was a few years ago Bushnell jumped on the AR bandwagon and began releasing a series of scopes aimed solely at the tactical market.  The Drop Zone 223 ($145.00) was one of those scopes.  It was introduced as a budget 1 to 4 power optic with a 223 Bullet drop compensating reticle. Bushnell AR w/ Drop Zone 223 Reticle 149 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 149 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The 1-4x scope market has exploded in the last few years though, and these days Bushnell offers an excellent entry level optic into this realm.  1 to 4 on an AR 15 is just about perfect for both close and long range shooting.  They followed it up even more recently with the AK Optics ($197.54, which are nearly identical to the AR drop zone, but built for the AK of course. Bushnell AK Optics 1-4x24mm Rifle Scope 215 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 215 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The magnification range is perfect for both the AK and AR style of rifle.   At the 1 marker you can use a two eyes open method of shooting with the illuminated reticle for an impromptu red dot.  When you need to reach out and touch a target all you need to do is spin the magnification dial and start engaging. I own the AK optics variant of this very scope and it’s brilliantly made.  A bit longer than I think necessary, but it doesn’t affect function. It’s very simple to use, and surprisingly rugged. Photo Courtesy of LoadoutRoom.com and the author. The AR optic is tuned to work with 55 to 62 grain 223 loads. There is a minimal difference in the flight paths of these rounds and their drop is similar enough for the reticle to work for both weights. The AK optic is tuned for 123 grain rounds.  This covers your most common AK ammo from Wolf, Tula, and more. The bullet drop compensator goes out to 500 yards and utilizes illuminated mil dots to mark where each round is destined to go.  The system is simple, and reliable. Again, when using the AK version I’ve had zero issues ringing steel at 300 yards. The optics are simple, reliable, and most of all affordable.  The AR variant is less than a 150 dollars, and the AK optic stays under 200 dollars. Bonus: Primary Arms FFP 4-14x Scope ($229.00) – A Budget Long Range optic? Am I slightly biased here?  Just to clear the air and to be transparent I am a friend of the guys at Primary Arms.  I got to meet them at Shot Show and we had a good time, and they were incredibly accommodating. Primary Arms FFP 4-14x44mm Scope with ACSS Reticle 280 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 280 at Primary Arms Compare prices (2 found) Primary Arms (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing With that said I’ve always been a fan of their FFP Tactical scope ($229.99).  It’s certainly a powerful optic and it offers you a nice wide 4 to 14 power magnification range. Primary Arms FFP 4-14x It’s also in the first focal plane! First focal plane scopes are the better optic for long range shooting. With a First focal plane scope the measurements between mil dots (or any other markings) remain the same regardless of the scope’s magnification setting.  This makes it a lot easier to gauge bullet drop when shooting long range. First focal plane scopes are also normally pretty expensive, they start around 500 bucks and only get more expensive.  Primary Arms has managed to produce one for right around 250 dollars. The Primary Arms FFP is a solid choice for long range shooting on a budget.  It seems to be best suited for 308 Winchester and below.  The reticle is a mil dot variant that allows easy estimation of bullet drop and wind correction if you know what you’re doing. "The Primary Arms" FFP has become quite popular, especially among new shooters.  It’s easily one of the most well regarded foreign made optics.  Primary Arms also offers an outstanding warranty and great customer service. The guys over at The Truth About Guns did a pretty outstanding review on the Primary Arms FFP , and have updated it over a two year period. Stand and Deliver Choosing an optic is always a little tricky, especially when choosing affordable optics.  You just need to remember to identify your needs first and determine if an affordable optic can fill that role. Sometimes it won’t be possible, but unless you need a weapon for duty use, its likely quite possible.  Just remember, check the warranty, check what reputable sources say about the optics, and of course what other buyers have said. It’s often easy to separate cheap from affordable, and if you can manage that you’ll get rid of the optics blues before you know it. How did we do on the list? If you’re looking for our complete set of optics recommendations…check out our Reviews Section .

Best Youth Guns: Choosing a Firearm for Your Child

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Choosing the best gun for your child is about more than models and brand names.  It is about setting your child on the path and way of life. Grandpa with Grandkid and Gun Did you know that it takes a village to raise a responsible gun owner? In rural areas, guns are part of daily life.  The entire community helps teach children gun safety and marksmanship. Children living in cities do not always have this background or community support.  Every child, no matter where they live, should have these skills: Age appropriate responses to the presence of a gun Learn how to handle a gun without endangering others Learn how to shoot with accuracy and competence. Situational awareness Boy Scouts Marksmanship Over the years, I have helped teach young children about marksmanship and gun safety. My experiences include working with: Boy Scouts of America Marksmanship teams JROTC shooting teams Junior Rifle Club (As an NRA distinguished expert junior shooter, I used to help younger members of the team) Today, I would like to share some tips on how to get your children started on the path to responsible and safe gun use. Choosing the Right Gun When you are choosing gun models for a child to learn on, never forget that there is no such thing as a “toy” gun. If a device can deliver a projectile, it must be handled with respect and consideration.  With that in mind, here are the guns and ammo caliber choices that I have found work best for youths: Daisy 1938 Red Ryder BB Gun Daisy Red Ryder BB Gun This is THE classic BB gun ($40). It is an ideal first gun for any child interested in hunting and competition shooting. The Daisy 1938 is a low velocity, lever action rifle that can be used in most cities.  It has helped many youths safely practice and perfect their style for years. Gamo Silent Cat Air Rifle (.177) with 4X32mm Scope Gamo Silent Cat Air Rifle This air rifle ($140) is a break barrel single cocking rifle that doesn’t use CO2. It has a rifled barrel for greater accuracy and pellet velocity can range from 1,000 FPS to 1,200 FPS depending on the type of pellets used. The rifle has excellent front and rear sights, or the shooter can use the supplied 4x32mm scope. This rifle makes for an excellent second gun for children aged 8 to 12 and is an ideal intermediary between the BB gun and a .22LR rifle.  Usage in city limits varies by local laws. Crickett Youth Model Crickett 22 LR The Crickett ($119) is a single shot .22 LR caliber bolt action rifle. It has a smaller barrel and scaled down design suitable for children aged 6 to 10.  This model also features a safety that must be disengaged for every shot. Children in city settings might have this as a 3rd gun in a series.  Youths in country settings might start off with this model. Henry Mini-Bolt Youth Rifle Henry Mini The Henry ($239) is also a .22 caliber, single shot, bolt action rifle.  It’s size also makes it ideal for children aged 6 to 10.  The Henry is similar to the Crickett in that it can be a first or third firearm. Marlin XT-22 Rimfire Rifle Marlin XT-22Y The XT-22Y ($189) is a bolt action, 7 shot clip magazine rifle.  It is good for target practice and small game. Children aged 10 and up can use this gun as an upgrade from the Cricket or the Henry.  Regardless of locality, it should not be a first gun for a child. What happens after you get your child their first gun? Seeking Out a Neutral Instructor As a boy, my father refused to teach me how to shoot, even though he was more than capable.  I was surprised to find that some rural community dwellers shared the reasons that he gave me: A parent might forgive or overlook dangerous actions. Even minor coddling can lead to injury or death for someone later on. An experienced instructor will recognize mistakes in form faster. Good quality instructors know how to get students to progress with speed and efficiency. Gun ownership and use are not solitary pursuits, and should not be seen as such. Good marksmanship is a fundamental of safety.  Objective teachers are the best ones. Bonds built between adults and contemporaries are critical to long term safety and competence. Seeking Out a Competent Community Instructor Most people today don’t live in a town where gun traditions have been handed down for centuries.  The following groups will be of help no matter where you live: Eddie Eagle Gunsafe Program Eddie Eagle This program is for children Pre-K to 3rd grade.  It teaches them what to do when they find a firearm. Every child should know these basics, regardless of whether they will go on to shoot or own guns later in life.  Children can also visit the Eddie Eagle Tree House website. This site teaches gun safety via colorful videos, sing alongs, and other activities. NRA Youth Shooting Program In traditional communities, children start hunting when they are about 6 years old. Eddie Eagle is an excellent program for city dwellers and others that do not plan to own guns.  But much more is needed for those who will be involved with firearms. The NRA Shooting Program combines resources to meet the needs of all ages and skill levels. Visit the site to see what is available in your area, and most suitable for your children. 4-H Clubs Shooting Education Program 4H 4H stands for Head, Heart, Hands and Health.  It is sponsored by the local cooperative extension. They focus on teaching children skills that can be used throughout life.  4H also gives children a chance to be good members of the community.  Their gun safety and marksmanship programs are excellent and will be of use to all. National Junior Shooting Camps Shooting camps have safe, well designed sites located throughout the country. Many of these groups focus on sports marksmanship .  This includes preparation for shooting in the Olympics and other international competitions . Their common mission is to provide highly trained and qualified coaches.  They are also an excellent resource for advancing junior marksmanship goals. Hunting Lodges Hunting Lodge Some lodges offer hunter safety classes suitable for youths. Do some research into their safety record before enrolling your child.  Talk to the local police and property owners that have a good bit of land with game animals. Make sure the lodge is trusted by people that have to deal most often with irresponsible gun users.  You will not want your child to learn the wrong customs and practices.  Later on, bad habits can be hard to undo. Keep Your Child Socially Connected Responsible gun ownership, gun safety, and good marksmanship are all lifelong journeys.  Practicing good habits and remaining in contact with suitable peers is necessary.  Here are some programs and suggestions that can help your child stay on the right track now and for life: A Girl and a Gun Today, the rate of women becoming new gun owners continues to increase at an exponential rate.  Parents that want daughters to get the best possible training should try this group.   This organization is also open to adult women that have an interest in being better  gun owners. NRA Membership Junior membership gives access to media on shooting sports, safety, competitive shooting and hunting.  Youths also gain free entry to the NRA annual show.  The NRA also has programs for adults featuring   issues related to gun ownership. NRA Home Airguns Program This program focuses on the use of airguns and their use in marksmanship development.  Parents, teachers, and activity leaders can learn how to select BB guns or air guns.  You will also  learn how to construct both permanent and temporary ranges. Other Groups In these days, simply being a safe gun owner and good marksman is not enough.  Youths that don’t know their legal responsibilities will have problems later on. USCCA , NAGR , and other legislative action groups may not be for children and youths.   As your children mature, you may feel it is appropriate to introduce them to these groups. Understand Why You Want Your Children to Learn About Guns When I ask parents why they want their children to have a gun, I am often met with silence.  Some may say they want their child to take part in a sport.  Others say they want their child to be able to hunt for food. Most parents will not say they are worried about rising crime rates, yet this is a valid reason to learn how to use a gun.  No parent wants to think about a time when their child may have to use a gun for self defense. Being clear about why you want your child to learn how to use a gun is a vital key to choosing a good instructor. Each time your child practices firing a gun, they will be developing muscle memory.  Bad habits can spell disaster while good ones can lead to many rewards.   Expensive guns or  accessories won’t take the place of good training and quality practice. As a police officer I have seen what can happen when children and adults misuse firearms. Just because someone is “under age” that does not mean a gun is a toy.  Nor does it mean that serious injury or death won’t result from careless actions.  When choosing the best gun for your children, remember it will change your child’s life.  Make sure that you include the following points in your purchasing decision: Good instructors Age appropriate firearms A sound social support structure Respect for public safety Knowledge of gun laws and how they work Clear understanding gun uses You can also start with our Beginner Guides to Shooting . All these elements work together to make gun ownership a pleasurable and rewarding experience.  Ignoring these elements when making purchasing decision is the fastest way to disaster.  It is my hope that your children enjoy the vibrance and beauty of the gun culture and gun ownership as much as I do.

Tips to consider while purchasing rifle scope

An Optic is arguably the single most important accessory for a firearm. After all, you can’t expect to hit a target if you can’t see it fully and clearly. With the increased visibility provided by the right optics for your particular firearm, you’ll have a much greater chance of solidly hitting your target. It’s easy to feel confused when buying a best rifle scope or other shooting optics for the first time. What do all the numbers mean? Is bigger always better? The market is literally flooded with hundreds of different scopes with varying powers, settings and features. However, choosing the right rifle scope starts with identifying your needs. If you’re looking for a new scope for your hunting rifle , then you’ll likely want one that’s capable of gathering as much light as possible. Deer and other big game can be the most active during the early morning and late afternoon hours, which happens to be when sunlight is limited. A rifle scope will illuminate the view of your target much better than the human eye in the same setting. Although the “normal” rifle scope isn’t technically considered night-vision, it does help to collect more illumination in semi-dark conditions. In addition to a rifle scope’s light gathering ability, you should also be aware of its magnification power. A higher magnification power allows for viewing targets at longer distances. Remember, though, just because you’re able to see a target at a certain distance doesn’t automatically mean your rifle is capable of hitting it at that distance. Most rifle scopes will have a label like 3x9x50, which means it operates at 9x magnifications and features an objective leans of 50mm. A bigger objective lens is usually preferred by most hunters, as it gives them a broader (wider) view at the target area. Some rifle scopes will feature an adjustable magnification power , which allows the user to raise or lower magnification based on the target’s distance. For instance, a rifle scope labeled 4.5x14x50 allows the user to adjust the magnification power by 14 times. It’s important to note that the higher magnification power a rifle scope has the less light it will gather. A common mistake hunters make is to choose a rifle scopes based on its magnification power alone. The truth is, however, that you don’t need a strong magnification power when you’re hunting in dense woods. A solid 3 or 4 power is all it takes to provide a crystal-clear view of your game, while also giving you a high level of light retention. In fact, when hunting in a more dense setting you might actually want to use binoculars instead of your rifle scope. This helps to minimize movement and allows for quicker response time when spotting your target. A rangefinder is also another useful tool when hunting game in open areas at long distances. Many people don’t realize just how much gravity affects a bullet’s trajectory at long distances. Unless the “gravity factor” is taken into account, the bullet isn’t going to hit the target; at least not where you aim. A rangefinder will help you compensate for gravity, or bullet drop by giving you an accurate distance to your target. You can then use this distance measurement to adjust where on the target you should put your scope’s reticle. by kennblanchard This post first appeared on http://blackmanwithagun.com Consider subscribing to our http://podcast.blackmanwithagun.com https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/black-man-with-a-gun/id267726144

Summary

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